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Looking for Directors – How it Felt

Board member/s wanted for social enterprise ‘How It Felt’

Based: Dundee, Scotland

About

‘How It Felt’ is a community based puppet building, drama and film making workshop service run by Director Deborah Chapman. A Duncan of Jordanstone Graduate and where the project began as a short film of puppets based on the public expressing themselves and their families affected by ADHD in “How do you see ADHD?”

Since then ‘How It Felt’ has grown into a collaborative business that provides puppet and film making workshops. Focusing mainly on but not limited to mental and emotional health issues that can be difficult to talk about and often misunderstood.

What were looking for

We are currently looking for new additional member or members to have on our board of directors to help run and organize the various tasks that could contribute to How It Felt. Board members would be required to attend a meeting or two bi monthly to update and discuss the enterprises progress on the set tasks they have been given. This could involve admin, correspondence with clients, applications and proposals for funding, accounts and fiancé, marketing, organization of events and workshops, involvement with the community, representing the enterprise at events.

For the time being this would be a voluntary position but could be paid in the future but catering and travel expense could be covered. It would be a great opportunity to gain experience as a director of an enterprise and working within the third sector.

Qualities looking for in a director

  • IT literate
  • Experience of software’s such as Microsoft word and Excel
  • Experience with accounting and organizes finances
  • Organizational skills
  • Can work on their own or within the board
  • Honest

Additional qualities could include more than one

  • Interests or experience in the arts
  • Interests or experience in mental health
  • Interests or experience in education and the third sector
  • Interests or experience with puppets and puppetry
  • Interests or experience in art therapy

If interested contact us at

contact@howitfelt.com

For more information catch us at

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/HowItFelt/

 

 

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Abertay Food Jam

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Social Enterprise Academy would like to invite you and members of your team along to our one-day Tackling Food Poverty with an Enterprising Approach programme, which aims to strengthen your enterprising knowledge and skills to further support you and your food waste projects and ideas.

You will have the opportunity and space to share ideas and good practice, and explore steps on creating a sustainable social enterprise approaches to community leadership, as well as develop a strong peer-networking group.

Timings
Friday 31st March 2017.
9:30am for registration and coffee/tea, to start at 10:00am sharp.

The day will be split into 4 sessions with regular refreshment breaks. Lunch will be provided. The day will close at 4pm unless otherwise agreed.

Venue
Abertay University, Bell St, Dundee, DD1 1HG
Room 1001 – please check in at main reception

It is free to attend but places are limited so please see attached a flyer with more information and once registered we will send out further details. To register click HERE

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TrACK – Training sessions for Third Sector Organisations

track logoFollowing  from successful funding from Dundee Social Enterprise Network, Along Came Kirsty (DSEN Member) would like to give you a chance to give your organisation support and development across a number of vital fields.

Are you new to the post?  Volunteering?  Want experience in the third sector?  Would like to refresh skills or simply get together with like-minded people to discuss the different areas that affect the third sector?
If you’re looking for inspiring, useful and affordable training, check out our upcoming 10 TrACK training session – all specifically tailored for small charities and social enterprises.

The 10 sessions include:

  • The Funding Process- Grant Application, Applying to Trusts
  • Presentation Skills
  • Motivating Your Team, Team Effectiveness and Productivity
  • Management of Volunteers and Placements
  • Charity Law: Roles and Responsibilities of the Board
  • Charity Finance
  • Corporate Social Responsibility
  • Press & Media Training
  • Social Media
  • Property

These courses are delivered in partnership with local businesses who are expert in their field. The course is open to staff or volunteers from third sector organisations, community groups or individuals who are keen to learn or refresh knowledge on some of the fundamental areas of the third sector.

Sign up to TrACK 10 for only £450. It may be possible to sign up for individual sessions at a cost of £50 each. Dates to be confirmed.

To note interest please email: clare@alongcamekirsty.co.uk or have a chat to her at the March session of Charity Chit Chat.

Kirsty is also available to come to your workplace to deliver in house training on a range of topics. For more information contact kirsty@alongcamekirsty.co.uk

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Entrepreneurship Week Dundee Social Entrepreneurs

Entrepreneurship Week Dundee
Social Entrepreneurs

Date: 21 February 2017 Time: 15:00 – 17:00
Venue: Dalhousie Building, Room 2F14, Old Hawkhill, Dundee, DD1 5EN

 

Open to: University of Dundee Students, Staff, Graduates & General Public

As part of the University of Dundee’s Entrepreneurship Week 2017Dundee Social Enterprise Network will be delivering a workshop providing an understanding of what a Social Enterprise is, how to start and run one and what support is available to you to get one off the ground. More details soon but register below in advance.

#UoDEntWeek2017

To register click HERE

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The Long Road To Mandalay (via Hong Kong) Part 5 The Finale

Angus Greenshields - Development Officer

Angus Greenshields – Development Officer

The Long Road To Mandalay (via Hong Kong) Part 5

Thursday 29th Sep  

It was an early trip on the Thursday morning to visit a rural social enterprise situated on the Ayeyawaddy River Delta.  This was an area that was particularly devastated by Cyclone Nargis in 2008, which killed some 140,000 people and left almost 2.5 million homeless.  This disaster was compounded by the fact that Myanmar’s isolation meant that initially no foreign aid or support could access the country.  Local people and organisations tried valiantly to help, but undoubtedly this was still the worst natural disaster in the countries’ history.

Our bus driver was obviously experienced and skilled, but I eventually had to stop looking out the front window, as the road contained a diverse range of hazards – cows, cyclists teetering along carrying huge bundles, people walking and oncoming vehicles playing chicken on our side of the road.

We were being hosted by a SE, Proximity Designs who support rural communities; providing microfinance, providing farm advisory services and designing and selling farm equipment to improve growing conditions.

We were based in a township called Kyungyangone. It is mainly bamboo huts, surrounded by paddy fields. We spoke to one farmer who has seven acres of paddy, and who has received microfinance from Proximity to develop these fields. The microfinance is offered on a ‘group’ basis, where several smallholders come together to form a group. Although they borrow individual amounts, the group work together to ‘guarantee’ one another’s repayments. They have to attend regular meetings with Proximity, which teach them about farming methods and opportunities for development.

One of the particular farming innovations that people had adopted was to add salt to the water in the rice fields.  This helped to kill pests and eliminate unproductive rice shoots.  The salinity level was checked by placing an egg on the water – if it just floated, it was perfect.

Temperatures were soaring into the upper 30s, with high humidity and as we toured the paddy fields under the midday sun, I was sure I was about to keel over at any moment.

Mad dogs and social entrepreneurs go out …..

Mad dogs and social entrepreneurs go out …..

Villagers were so friendly and hospitable and welcomed us into their homes.  I was struck in one of the houses by a picture of young boy in monk’s robes.  Over 60% of all males will spend some time as a monk.  I could tell that his parents were honoured that their son had taken up this calling, but also that they missed him so much.  I could however see the benefits of sending my son to a monastery – occasionally.

4

Picture of their son

 

This was in truth the closest I did actually get on my ‘Road to Mandalay’ – but maybe closer than Robbie Williams got? The return bus journey to Yangon was again ‘interesting’ – made even more so with a torrential downpour thrown in.

 

Friday 30th Sep

On the morning, we visited Phandeeyar in down town Yangon.  It is an innovation lab who are trying to use technology to benefit society.

Technology is a nascent sector in Myanmar and most developers are self-taught. A smart phone costs on average $23, and data is 1kyat per MB (1,700 Kyats is £1). The result of this is that, even in the rural areas, mobile technology is advancing quickly, and while people don’t have a computer (so don’t use websites), they are more and more frequently using ‘apps’.

Phandeeyar have hosted a number of hackathons, including a highly successful ‘let’s vote’ hack challenge. 30 teams competed over two weeks, and the winning app, which was designed to provide unbiased information in the lead up to the general election had 200k downloads in 5 weeks – and it could be argued played a significant part in ensuring the countries first successful and fair election.

Phandeeyar have core funding from a number of sources but fundraise for individual projects. A recent accelerator programme attracted 80 applicants, and six successful candidates are working in the Phandeeyar office. They also provide co-working space for 30,000 kyat per month and have about 60 users of the space.

In the afternoon we participated in a SE Symposium that attracted delegates from the government and a wide range of national and international stakeholder organisations.  This again gave fascinating insights into some of the challenges that SE faces, but also how it is so positively impacting in the redevelopment of Myanmar.  There was a somewhat abrupt end to proceedings as we had overrun our time slot and wedding guests led by the very vocal and agitated groom, ‘invaded’ our conference room.

Saturday was our last day in Yangon and we had a tour around the famous Scott Market which is an incredible warren of stalls selling every product under the sun.  Once again the temperature and humidity were oppressive and we decided to have a break at a small café.  I ordered what was titled a ‘Strawberry Sherbet’ and was eagerly anticipating a long ice cold fruit drink to quench my thirst.  A steaming bowl of hot sago soup, with spring onion and a large slice of submerged bread arrived.  The owner hovered over me like a mother hen to ensure I finished every drop.  Lost in Translation came to mind.

 

So wheres the strawberry then?

 

We then set off that evening on another marathon 24hr journey, back to Dundee.

 

It had been a wonderful, informative, emotional, tiring and inspirational trip and a few special mentions and thank yous: to Gerry, Johnny and Jo from CEIS who had organised it so wonderfully well.  DSEN for giving me this fantastic opportunity.  Those who organised and delivered the inspiring World Forum. All those who were involved in the life changing enterprises that we visited and to Tristan, Mae and Mimi and all their colleagues from the British Council who so expertly hosted and guided us in Myanmar.    And of course to my fellow tour party colleagues from across the globe. A pleasure and a privilege to spend time with you all.

Next World Social Enterprise Forum is in Christchurch in 2017.

Thank You     谢谢        多謝

        ကျေးဇူးတင်ပါတယ်   Tapadh leat

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